Monkeypox: The High Health Authority determines the vaccination strategy for children and first-time vaccinees

the essential
The High Authority for Health (HAS) specifies its vaccination strategy to be implemented around a confirmed case of monkeypox for those vaccinated against smallpox and children in childhood.

Monkeypox cases continue to rise in France. This Monday, June 20, the High Authority for Health (HAS) announced details on the vaccination of certain population groups. Following the recommendation in May to vaccinate adults with risk contacts, the HAS was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to define the vaccination strategy for children and first-time offenders (people who were vaccinated against smallpox during childhood).

#Communicates | entry from @sante_gouv HAS specifies the vaccination strategy to be implemented around a confirmed case of #monkeypox for those who were vaccinated against smallpox and children in childhood.
? https://t.co/q7lIVYZkyx pic.twitter.com/VtWCjoDqbd

– High Health Authority (@HAS_sante) June 20, 2022

For first-time visitors

For first-line contacts vaccinated against smallpox with a first-generation vaccine before 1980, the HAS has recommended the administration of a single dose of Imvanex vaccine (Bavarian Nordic) who are immunocompromised, prior vaccination with a different smallpox vaccine does not alter what was originally intended for this patient population recommended vaccination schedule, ie three doses of Imvanex.

For children

The Imvanex vaccine is only approved for adults, but several studies of other vaccines using the same platform as Imvanex have shown good tolerability in children over four months, according to HAS. She therefore recommended that reactive vaccination of vulnerable contact children “could be considered to protect children who are exposed and may be more likely to develop severe forms of the disease, particularly the most sensitive and immunocompromised”.

Also read:
Monkeypox: Vaccination has started in some countries including France

But with no clinical data on the safety of third-generation vaccines, the HAS recommended that vaccinating minors “be considered on a case-by-case basis, only by specialists, and after a rigorous risk-benefit assessment for the minor concerned”.

Leave a Comment